Position papers
  • 14-Jul
  • 2017

Parliament members may override the presidential veto on provisional measures 756 and 758, and analyze a new draft bill that affects the same region

São Paulo, July 14, 2017 - Even though president Michel Temer has vetoed Provisional Measures (MP) 756 and 758, which threatened to reduce nearly 600,000 hectares of important forest protection areas in the states of Pará and Santa Catarina, this week the subject returned to members of Congress, who may reject the presidential decision. Additionally, a new draft bill (PL 8107/2017) was presented to the Chamber of Deputies yesterday with the utmost urgency, to specifically address the reduction of 349,085 hectares in the Jamanxim National Forest, in Pará.

Analysis of the MP vetoes had been scheduled for the Chamber during yesterday's plenary session on July 13. But the subject was struck from the agenda and should be analyzed before the Chamber’s next session on August 15.

MP 756 and 758 not only affect the Jamanxim National Forest (Flona), but the Jamanxim National Park in Pará and São Joaquim National Park in Santa Catarina, which are critical areas for preservation. For example, from 2004 to 2016 the Jamanxim National Forest lost more than 117,000 hectares of forests, which led to the release of 70 million tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, according to calculations from the Environmental Research Institute of the Amazon (IPAM). By 2030, the expropriation of this area may result in 280,000 fewer hectares of forest, and the emission of 140 million tons of CO2.

In May, the Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture publicly requested the veto of these measures. A letter signed by the Brazilian Coalition was delivered to the president and several other representatives of the Brazilian government. Numerous national and international organizations and leaders voiced their opposition, including the model Gisele Bundchen, who received Temer’s response with regard to the veto via Twitter.

The president vetoed the MP on the deadline for the sanctions, on the eve of a visit to the Norwegian government, which is a leading investor in the Amazon Fund. Even so, he could not reverse the image of increasing Brazilian deforestation, and Norway consequently announced a R$ 200 million cut in its donations to Brazil.

The goal of draft bill 8107 is to replace MP 756 and to further increase the area established in the original version of the MP, which converted part of the Jamanxim National Forest into an Environmental Protection Area (APA), a less rigid category which allows privately held properties, farming, and mining within these areas.

When announcing that Temer would veto MP 756 and 758, Environment Minister Sarney Filho had already declared that a draft bill would be submitted to address land conflicts and illegal activities in the region, which has been the scene of numerous protests. On July 7, pickup trucks belonging to the Brazilian Environmental Protection Agency (Ibama) were burned in an attack on this agency’s inspection and monitoring efforts.

The current social and environmental setbacks in Congress (according to these MP and this draft bill) go far beyond environmental damage. The country is not only losing investments, but also a great opportunity to position itself as a leader in the low-carbon economy; it is also ignoring the significant work of constructing regulatory frameworks like the Forest Code, and groundbreaking tools like the Rural Environmental Registry (CAR) and the National System for Control of the Origin of Forest Products (Sinaflor).

 

About the Brazilian Coalition

The Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture is a multi-sector movement established to propose initiatives and influence public policies that lead to the development of a low-carbon economy by creating decent jobs, encouraging innovation, Brazil’s global competitiveness and generating and distributing wealth across society. Over 150 companies, business associations, research centers and civil society organizations have already joined The Brazilian Coalition – coalizaobr.com.br/en

  • 21-Jun
  • 2017

São Paulo, June 21, 2017 - The Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests, and Agriculture – a multi-sector movement formed by over 150 companies, business associations, research centers and civil society organizations, that aims the development of a low-carbon economy – refutes the proposal that advances in Congress, which extends once again the time to register with the Environmental Rural Registry (CAR).

The draft bill PLS 287/2015, which is pending in the Senate, extends to May 2018 the limit of the benefits of the Forest Code, weakening its deployment agenda. Such extension disrespects the rural producers who have joined the CAR within the time limit set by the law and benefits those who are in the margins of legislation.

Most producers have already registered and started the process of compliance with the Code. Statistics available on the official CAR portal indicate that almost 100% of the areas that can be registered – based on data by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE) – are already registered in the system. In total, the CAR System (Sicar) has already registered over 400 million hectares, and more than 4 million rural owners and squatters with CAR throughout the country.

CAR certainly represents one of the utmost advances in the implementation of the Forest Code. The achieved results turned Sicar into one of the largest geospatial databases in the world, with a vast network of rural properties and settlements; as well as their respective areas of protection: legal reserves, permanent preservation area, and areas of restricted use. Sicar is one of the most relevant Geographic Information Systems (GIS) worldwide.

Therefore, the Brazilian Coalition understands there is no reason to extend, for the third time, the registration with CAR. A possible extension of the legal term only benefits a small part of landowners, who already had more than enough time to rectify.

The Brazilian Coalition also highlights the urgency to intensify Government’s support regarding the registration of the small rural producers, settlers, and quilombolas, so that they may be in the Sicar’s base within the term established in the current law. We believe the priority now is to ensure progress in the CAR’s validation process by the States, and the implementation of the Environmental Regularization Program (PRA). These actions will bring even more credibility to the Forest Code, and to Brazil's leading position in the international environmental markets and agendas, by showing markets that the country's agricultural products respect the law, and demonstrating Brazil's engagement to commitments such as the Paris Agreement.

Thus, concerning the Brazilian institutions and the laws created, the Brazilian Coalition stands against any modification in the Forest Code that brings greater legal insecurity to the rural producer, damages to the environmental agenda, and delays in the implementation of this legislation. Therefore, we request the senators and deputies from Parliamentary Fronts of Agriculture and the Environment, and other representatives, not to follow up on this agenda, avoiding the increase of divergences and changes in the agri-environmental agenda.

 

About the Brazilian Coalition

The Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture is a multi-sector movement established to propose initiatives and influence public policies that lead to the development of a low-carbon economy by creating decent jobs, encouraging innovation, Brazil’s global competitiveness and generating and distributing wealth across society. Over 150 companies, business associations, research centers and civil society organizations have already joined The Brazilian Coalition – coalizaobr.com.br/en

  • 12-Jun
  • 2017

São Paulo, 12th June, 2017

Your Excellencies President of Brazil, Michel Temer, and Ministerial Officials of the Interministerial Committee on Climate Change (CIM):

Minister Aloysio Nunes (Foreign Affairs), Minister Blairo Maggi (Agriculture, Livestock and Supply), Minister Eliseu Padilha (Chief of Staff), Minister Fernando Coelho Filho (Mines and Energy), Minister Gilberto Kassab (Science, Technology, Innovation and Communications), Minister Marcos Pereira (Industry, Foreign Trade and Services), Minister Osmar Terra (Social and Agrarian Development) and Minister Sarney Filho (Environment).

President and Ministers,

The Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture1, a multi-sector movement formed by over 150 companies, associations, research centers and civil society organizations, announces this manifesto in response to the public consultation of the Ministry of the Environment on the strategy for the implementation of the Brazilian climate commitment (Nationally Determined Contribution on climate, NDC) presented at COP 21 in Paris. We acknowledge the efforts of the Brazilian Government and we congratulate the choice of a collective and participatory step in the construction of the NDC's strategy. The purpose of this letter is to gather and disclose Coalition's view on the Government's proposals and to increase our readiness, as well as our members’, to contribute to the construction of this strategy.

The main objective of the Brazilian Coalition is to propose actions and influence public policies that lead to the development of a low-carbon, competitive, responsible and inclusive economy. The movement also seeks to identify synergies between the agendas for protection, conservation and sustainable use of forests, agriculture, and mitigation and adaptation to climate change. These contributions are necessary because the forestry and land use sector represents the main opportunity to reduce the net emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) in Brazil2. At the same time, it is a central sector for the country, since Brazil currently represents 7% of the world's food production, and intends to reach 10% in five years3. Such leadership and ambition require commitment to the responsible use of its natural resources and to the economic valuation of renewable activities related to land use. The search for more balance between forest conservation and the efficient use of our soil for agricultural production is one of the biggest challenges and opportunities for Brazil in the coming years.

The various organizations that form the Brazilian Coalition4 held a series of meetings to review the base document presented by the Ministry of the Environment. Therefore, the government's public consultation triggered an important conversation between members with different roles and expectations in the agricultural production and environmental conservation agenda. As a result of the consensus within this group, we understand that NDC's implementation strategy should not be treated only as a way to fulfill a public commitment, but rather as a low-carbon development agenda for Brazil that brings economic opportunities, achieving positive results in production, employment and income generation, and environmental conservation, simultaneously.

Betting on a low-carbon economy can bring Brazil to a new status in the international arena, since the adaptation to international market standards is a factor of competitiveness. It also demonstrates its commitment to the global climate change agenda, in which the country ranks as one of the world's largest emitters and, at the same time, as a potential leader of one of the most renewable energy matrices on the planet. Therefore, the country must contribute to the solution of this problem by reducing its GHG emissions5 and seeking means of implementation and opportunities that enable the necessary changes. Brazil's recent past demonstrates that it is possible to meet the demands of the productive sector and the commitment to reduce GHG emissions since the deforestation rates in the Amazon decreased between 2004 and 2012, the same period in which the Brazilian agricultural production grew significantly. We believe that this new economy will also bring fundamental social impacts, such as the creation of quality jobs, the generation and distribution of wealth, improvements in people's health, greater recognition and protection of indigenous populations and traditional communities, and other benefits to society as a whole.

Given the magnitude, diversity, complexity, and interdependence of the various measures involved in the NDC implementation, the Brazilian Coalition considers it is necessary to develop a national strategy based on integrated and not specific actions. The lack of transversality was identified by the Brazilian Coalition as the main flaw of the base document presented by the Ministry of the Environment, since the suggested actions are not connected to each other, although they are adequate for a NDC implementation strategy. In addition, the NDC is an opportunity to observe not only the transversality of actions, but also the transversality of the ministries, allowing more synergy and complementarity among them.

For the transition towards a new economy, and to structure new production and consumption patterns, some national and international economic mechanisms will be necessary. The action of the market force alone will not be enough to reach the climatic goals and economic turnaround if it is not regulated by public policies and instruments capable of inducing new vectors of demand and supply. These instruments include carbon pricing, payment for environmental services, REDD+, etc.

In addition, the regulatory frameworks of a low-carbon economy must also be strengthened, because these instruments will ensure security for investments and enable social control actions. In this aspect, the Brazilian Coalition stresses the role not only of environmental milestones, but of many others, such as the ones regulating the energy, logistics and concessions sectors, among others. These sectors can guarantee a modus operandi and a production flow that are consistent with the efficient use of the soil, from a life cycle perspective related to production and distribution chains, and the increase of the participation of the renewable energies in the Brazilian matrix.

It will also be necessary to structure the country's climate governance, indicating responsible agencies and implementation deadlines. Monitoring actions are critical to measuring the effectiveness of investments and understanding how to direct them in the best way. Together with governance, transparency is a necessary factor. This will allow society to monitor and evaluate the progress of the climate goals. Therefore, it is also necessary to guarantee mechanisms of participation and engagement for different participants.

Finally, the development, availability, access and diffusion of technologies for new economic models must complete the transition to a low-carbon development. Whether in agricultural production or forestry business, innovation is the driver of a new economy, which must be accompanied by training and technical assistance to workers.

This letter brings the main elements that the Brazilian Coalition understands should be reformulated and added to the Brazilian NDC's strategy. The appendices (available in Portuguese) detail and exemplify the points here mentioned and discuss aspects related to i. NDC's economic opportunities; ii. Strategy transversality; iii. Need for economic mechanisms; iv. Strengthening of regulatory frameworks and public policies; v. Investments in energy, logistics and infrastructure; vi. Governance, transparency and monitoring; and viii. Innovation and technology. With this, we hope to have contributed to this work and remain at the government's disposal.

Organizations that participate in the Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture:

1Executive coordination: luana@coalizaobrasil.org | (55 11) 98433-7096 | coalizaobr.com.br
2Responsible for 46% of GHG emissions in 2015, according to SEEG (Greenhouse Gas Emission Estimate System) data.
3According to the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Supply.
4The Brazilian Coalition is formed by eight working groups, which bring members together in discussions about low-carbon agriculture, bioenergy, forest code, international cooperation, tropical forest economy, logistics, restoration/reforestation, and valuation and ecosystem services.
5The Brazilian NDC is committed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 37% below 2005 levels by 2025 with a subsequent indicative contribution of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 43% below 2005 levels by 2030.

 

Access to the Annex 1 - Statement from the Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture about the Public Consultation on the basic document to implement the Brazilian NDC

 

Brazilian Coalition's response to the public consultation in Portuguese:

 

About the Brazilian Coalition

The Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture is a multi-sector movement established to propose initiatives and influence public policies that lead to the development of a low-carbon economy by creating decent jobs, encouraging innovation, Brazil’s global competitiveness and generating and distributing wealth across society. Over 150 companies, business associations, research centers and civil society organizations have already joined The Brazilian Coalition – coalizaobr.com.br/en

  • 25-May
  • 2017

São Paulo, May 25th, 2017

His Excellency President of Brazil, Michel Temer,

The Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture – movement formed by civil society representatives, the business sector and the academic community – requests to the President of the Republic to veto the provisional acts 756/2016 and 758/2016. These provisional acts approved by the Senate plenary on May 23rd (bills 4/2017 and 17/2017) reduced the Jamanxim National Forest (Flona), in the municipality of Novo Progresso (PA), the National Park (Parna) of Jamanxim, in the municipalities of Itaituba and Trairão (PA) and the Parna of São Joaquim (SC).

The approval of these provisional acts goes against the protection of the environment and the battle with the growing deforestation in Brazilian biomes. Moreover, it compromises the credibility of the necessary economic development initiatives in the country. These acts bring irreparable damage to biodiversity and climate and will benefit a few individuals at the expense of the national interest.

The approval of these laws will withdraw the protection of 588.5 thousand hectares of forests in the Amazon and cause the reduction of 20% of Parna de São Joaquim, one of the main refuges of the Atlantic Forest biodiversity, the most threatened biome in the country. It will result in increased illegal exploitation and depredation encouraged by the highest authority of the Republic, creating an undesirable precedent for new occupations of areas preserved in Conservation Units (Unidades de Conservação, UCs).

Jamanxim Flona, created in February 2006, along with other UCs, has an important role in the region and form a green barrier with more than 6.4 million hectares. This initiative managed to contain the overwhelming advance of deforestation along the BR-163 – a highway that connects Cuiabá (MT) to Santarém (PA) – which increased by more than 650% between 2001 and 2004, as a result of the acceleration of speculation Real estate of public lands.

Sectors that defend the approval of the reduction of these invaluable protected areas argue that the difficulties faced by the government to implement this protection prevented the effective control of illegal and predatory exploitation caused by deforestation and mining. However, reducing them is the worst way to try to solve the problems, which will actually worsen without legal protection. The analysis of the images obtained by the MapBiomas platform show the very high risk to which these areas will be submitted. These maps show that from 2004 to 2016 Jamanxim Flona lost more than 117 thousand hectares of forests, which released 70 million tons of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere according to calculations by the Environmental Research Institute of the Amazon (Instituto de Pesquisa Ambiental da Amazônia, IPAM). By 2030, the reduction of these areas can result in 280,000 hectares of less forests and in the emission of 140 million tons of CO2. This process needs to be avoided.

It is important to point out that the ICMBio, a federal body responsible for the management of UCs, has acknowledged in a report that the occupation of Jamanxim Flona is recent, stating that 67.7% of the occupants arrived there just before or shortly after its creation, in 2006. This data proves that the occupations had a speculative character.

Other legislative and executive proposals threaten the Amazon Region Protected Areas Program (Programa Áreas Protegidas da Amazônia, ARPA), which supports the UCs management in the region. The use of resources in ARPA (about US$ 215 million from international donors) is tied to a number of commitments, such as the maintenance of protected areas. Thus, the Government projects aimed at reducing, recategorizing and altering the limits of conservation units clearly disregard a Brazilian commitment, which may affect the investments of one of the world's largest programs of forest conservation in history.

The provisional acts approved by the Senate will affect legal security and will undermine investments in the country, moving away demanding investors and consumers of sustainable production systems. In a world in which socio-environmental criteria are increasingly at the heart of decision-making processes of large investors, Brazil is moving away from the possibility to become a competitive and respected economy.

In a scenario of intensified deforestation in Amazônia in the last two years, provisional acts such these ones stimulate predatory occupation and disregard for environmental protection areas, jeopardizing gains obtained in attempts to control deforestation in the region, and damage the image of the country and agribusiness.

Land regularization of areas with illegal deforestation can not be authorized by the Government. Otherwise, it will not be feasible to stop illegal deforestation, as expected by the Brazilian Forest Code, or to comply with the international climate and biodiversity agreements assumed by the country, such as the NDC implementation, which is fundamental for the development of a low carbon economy.

Brazil needs a national policy to address the challenges of illegal occupation and deforestation and to guarantee sustainability for the logistic projects in the Amazon, as in the case of Ferrogrão. The handling of these bills in Congress has not been successful and associates the railroad with unnecessary damage to the forest, biodiversity and climate. This drives out investors and may result in judicial inquiries. It is necessary to resume this debate, with technical bases and broad stakeholder participation.

The first step in this direction, President, is, in our view, the integral veto of the bills 04/2017 and 17/2017.

 

Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture

 

Deforestation growth in Jamanxim National Forest from 2000 to 2016

 

About the Brazilian Coalition

The Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture is a multi-sector movement established to propose initiatives and influence public policies that lead to the development of a low-carbon economy by creating decent jobs, encouraging innovation, Brazil’s global competitiveness and generating and distributing wealth across society. Over 150 companies, business associations, research centers and civil society organizations have already joined The Brazilian Coalition – coalizaobr.com.br/en

  • 23-Mar
  • 2017

Low-carbon Agriculture Working Group

São Paulo, March 23, 2017 - Technical assistance and dissemination of technology in the Brazilian countryside are topics of fundamental importance to the new economy, based on low emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs). Among the actions that should be part of the guidelines for the implementation of the Brazilian NDC (Nationally Determined Contributions) are the strengthening of technical assistance and rural extension organizations, training actions, and technology transfer. These actions will effectively contribute to the implementation of a low-carbon agriculture in all activities involved, supporting the recovery of degraded pastures, the integrated crop-livestock-forestry system (ICLF) and the forest recovery/restoration.

In this sense, in order to broaden the discussions and in search of widely agreed solutions, the Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture promoted in Brasilia, at the end of last year, a round table discussion with several professionals in the area. Conceived and organized by the Low-carbon Agriculture Working Group (GT ABC), the event had four panels composed by professionals from the public, private and civil society sectors, divided into:

  1. Public policies to promote technical assistance and dissemination of technology for family farming;
  2. Technical assistance in the private sector;
  3. Opportunities and synergies in the public and private sector; and
  4. Qualification of technical assistance professionals.

During five hours of debates, the following points were listed among the main challenges:

  • Non-methodological standardization of technical assistance and dissemination of technology for family farming: The particularities in this niche are given by different types of producers, productive arrangements and land use. All this reflects on specific policies. Therefore, technical assistance must have participatory approaches and quality, and be comprehensive and free. This demands human resources, time and strategy. Considering existing technical assistance programs from the federal government for family farming, we highlight those focused on agroecology and sustainability, and related to Low-Carbon Agriculture (ABC). It is worth mentioning that the National Policy for Technical Assistance and Rural Extension (PNATER) was created in 2010 and focuses on family farming.
  • Agricultural census: Updating producer profile data by region of the country through the agricultural census is strategic and decisive. It was planned for 2016, but it did not happen. The regional characterization of rural properties is extremely important and will allow the development of technical assistance and dissemination of technology strategies that can be applied to the needs of rural landowners.
  • Monitoring of results: In addition to diagnosing the needs of the producer, it is important to promote and monitor collaboratively the results of technical assistance to track the continuous improvement of processes. In this sense, there are already good examples of success in partnerships between private initiative and NGOs, connecting the producer and the monitoring.
  • Long-term vision: The private initiative points out that technical assistance experiences bring gains to all parties involved, with continuous improvement. However, for some themes, the results are not immediately perceived. The positive point identified by the private sector is that agricultural activity gains efficiency and productivity when the producer adapts their activities to sustainability standards (including compliance with environmental, social and labor legislation). In some cases, the industry pays them better or they reach new markets with better quality products.
  • Involving the entire production chain: Training, especially related to accessing new technologies and knowledge, must involve different participants from the productive chains - from producers to banking agents, including technicians.

Based on collected perceptions, GT ABC listed key measures focused on low-carbon agriculture in Brazil in order to improve technical assistance and dissemination of technology, with the objective of reaching the commitments agreed by the country in the Paris Agreement and translated into the Brazilian NDC.

  • Incentive to the generation and diffusion of participatory technology, with the explicit adhesion of rural producers.
  • Small-scale or territorial technical assistance planning at municipal or regional level that meets local challenges and specificities.
  • Active participation of the states, through the ABC State Plans, and state agencies for technical assistance and dissemination of technology.
  • Establishment of partnerships between public and private sectors, universities, agriculture federations, trade unions and financial agents. To achieve success and gain scale, it is necessary to establish partnerships and distribute responsibilities among the various participants of the productive chains.
  • Inclusion of low-carbon production techniques and integrated training, including business management and environmental and social aspects, in technical assistance.
  • Training of qualified technicians who are familiar with low-carbon production practices and prepared to assist the producer. This is still a significant gap.

Aware of the importance of technical assistance and dissemination of technology for the achievement of the Brazilian goals regarding to GHG emission reduction, the Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture intends to work with the federal government, private sector and civil society throughout this year of 2017 to advance the opportunities of enhancement of technical assistance and dissemination of technology, contributing to the scale gain of low-carbon agriculture in the country and compliance with the Brazilian NDC.

 

About the Brazilian Coalition

The Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture is a multi-sector movement established to propose initiatives and influence public policies that lead to the development of a low-carbon economy by creating decent jobs, encouraging innovation, Brazil’s global competitiveness and generating and distributing wealth across society. Over 150 companies, business associations, research centers and civil society organizations have already joined The Brazilian Coalition – coalizaobr.com.br/en

  • 14-Mar
  • 2017

São Paulo, March 14, 2017 – The Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture expresses its concern about the alarming increase in the deforestation rate, as well as its disagreement with recent legislative proposals that can reduce the protected areas in Conservation Units in the Amazon. The increase in forest deforestation places Brazil in the opposite direction of its goals for the National Policy on Climate Change for 2020 and compromises the Brazilian target set during the Paris Agreement.

In this moment when the country seeks to restore its confidence by retaking responsible economic management with focus on achieving its goals, it is crucial to return to the climate agenda objectives, especially in what regards to the drastic reduction of deforestation.

Data from the INPE (National Institute for Space Research) show that deforestation increased by 60% between 2014 and 2016. In 2016, the rate of deforestation reached almost 8,000 km2, more than twice the rate needed for the country to achieve the 80% reduction target for deforestation in 2020 set by the National Policy on Climate Change.

A study by the Environmental Research Institute of the Amazon (IPAM) shows that deforestation has increased within Conservation Units, as well as in public areas not yet destined to a specific use and in rural properties that are part of the Rural Environmental Registry (CAR). More than half of all deforested areas detected by INPE are part of the CAR.

This scenario is incompatible with Brazil's recent past: between 2005 and 2012 the country was one of the countries that most contributed to climate change mitigation. The positive result of that period was achieved, among other measures, by the substantial decrease in the Amazon deforestation, a consequence of successful strategies such as continuous monitoring, repression of illegal exploitation and the creation of Conservation Units. The deforestation reached 27,000 km2 in 2004, but decreased to 4,500 km2 in 2012, during a period of extraordinary progress in the Brazilian agricultural production. The recent reversal of this trend, with a sharp increase in deforestation, coincides with the decrease in the frequency of DETER data releases, the reduction of command and control actions, the interruption of the creation of new Conservation Units as well as the proposals to reduce old protected areas, low investment and lack of incentives for the conservation of forests and sustainable activities. In addition, based on preliminary data from the federal government, this upward trend should continue or even worsen in the coming years, jeopardizing the Brazilian climate commitment in the Paris Agreement — one of its pillars is to achieve zero illegal deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon until 2030.

Moreover, in recent months, congressmen and public agents have proposed the reduction of protected areas of the Conservation Units in the Amazon in about one million hectares. This is opposite to everything that the country has been defending nationally and internationally. The Brazilian Coalition understands that such actions open the way to greater forest destruction and put at risk traditional populations and economic activities directly or indirectly linked to the forest, such as agriculture, which is responsible for almost 25% of Brazil’s GDP.

It is crucial to resume the integrated agenda for the control of deforestation urgently, with actions that include (i) to resume the monthly disclosure of DETER deforestation alerts, (ii) to suspend the land regularization and credit processes and to make sure the parts involved in illegal deforestation will be held responsible, (iii) to implement a task force to promote the conservation and sustainable use of 60 million hectares of public forests not yet destined to a specific use and (iv) to suspend immediately all plans to reduce the Conservation Units.

The search for greater balance between forest conservation and the efficient use of our soils for agricultural production is one of the biggest challenges for Brazil in the coming years. According to the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Supply, a country that produces 7% — aiming to reach 10% in five years — of the world's food must be responsible and committed to the proper use of its natural resources.

Brazil is a central piece in the global efforts to face the challenges of climate change. The country has the technology necessary to increase its productivity without relying on deforestation. It also has the aspiration to be a more fair and responsible country towards its citizens and the planet. For this, it needs to develop, expand its economy, strengthen its agricultural production and, at the same time, protect its natural assets.

 

About the Brazilian Coalition

The Brazilian Coalition on Climate, Forests and Agriculture is a multi-sector movement established to propose initiatives and influence public policies that lead to the development of a low-carbon economy by creating decent jobs, encouraging innovation, Brazil’s global competitiveness and generating and distributing wealth across society. Over 150 companies, business associations, research centers and civil society organizations have already joined The Brazilian Coalition – coalizaobr.com.br/en